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Fedora 22 Release Party, Pune

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 10:29 PM in , ,
This is my attempt at bringing all details of the Fedora 22 Release Party, out live...right from the Pune Red Hat office.



10.55am - We have started our day today with a quick round of introductions...its always fun to know people!


We, the Fedorians....[Photo Credit - Suprith Gangawar]


11.05am - What is new in the Workstation for Fedora 22 and future, by Praveen Kumar.

Praveen is taking us through the Fedora workstation and the new features of Workstation for Fedora 22.

Praveen Kumar talks about the new features of Fedora 22 Workstation

Praveen is also introducing the participants to Boxes and how Boxes has made it easy for users to work on multiple VMs now.

Quick updates on Fedora 23:
  • Alpha freeze has been done last week.
  • On the feature side, for the Workstation, biggest change will be the container based application approach.
  • Developer assistant - a tool which will help a developer setup the entire development environment very easily and get started.
  • Wayland - Wayland is intended as a simpler replacement for X, easier to develop and maintain. GNOME and KDE are expected to be ported to it.
    [http://wayland.freedesktop.org/]
  • Gnome software application
The tasklist for Fedora 23, along with the status is available here - https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Workstation/Tasklist

11.50am - Introduction to FESCo, and Fedora package sponsorship model by Parag Nemade

After an introduction to the different ways in which we can start contributing to Fedora, Parag takes us through the criteria for sponsoring a new packager, the packaging guidelines etc.

A few quick notes:


Parag Nemad, talking about Fedora packaging [Photo Credit - Suprith Gangawar]
12.35pm - Status update from Fedora Cloud WG by Kushal Das, where he started the session with an introduction to Fedora Cloud and Cockpit. He continues by giving us a demonstration of Cockpit, from a system admin's perspective. 

To install Cockpit - dnf install cockpit

Kushal Das talks about cockpit [Photo Credit - Suprith Gangawar]

1pm to 2.15pm - Lunch break


2.20pm - Cloud group updates:

  • New in Fedora 22:
    • Vagrant box
    • Fedora Dockerfiles - example docker files for various applications.
    • Tunir[to install tunir - dnf install tunir]
    • Atomic Improvements - Atomic is a base OS, on top of which any container can be used.
    • Updated Docker images
  • Upcoming changes for Fedora 23:
    • Layered Docker Image Build Service
    • systemd-networkd
    • Could MOTD (Message of the day)
    • Two Week Atomic (project Atomic to breakout of Fedora release cycle and release in every two weeks).

2.45pm - Ways of getting started with Fedora contribution, lead by Siddhesh Poyarekar

Here is Siddhesh, explaining ARM [Photo Credit - Suprith Gangawar]


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Installing Sublime Text 3 on Fedora 21

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 2:43 AM in , , , , ,

Though the process of installing Sublime Text 3 on Fedora 21 is not difficult at all, the articles available online doesn't have the correct steps most of the time. Since I had to waste a decent amount of time to find the right script and install Sublime 3 on my machine, I thought I would document the steps, saving someone else's time.

The steps for installing Sublime Text 3 on Fedora 21 are:

Step 1: 

[1] For Linux x64:

wget -O install-sublime.sh https://gist.github.com/xtranophilist/5932634/raw/sublime-text-3-x64.sh && sudo sh install-sublime.sh; rm -rf install-sublime.sh

[2] For Linux x32:

wget -O install-sublime.sh https://gist.github.com/xtranophilist/5932634/raw/sublime-text-3-x32.sh && sudo sh install-sublime.sh; rm -rf install-sublime.sh


The content of these scripts can be found here : https://gist.github.com/xtranophilist/5932634

Step 2:

su -c "sh install-sublime-text.sh"

1

A well spent Women's day

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 4:49 AM in , ,
On the occasion of International Women's Day, the WoMoz (Women in Mozilla) community from Pune had decided to celebrate Womanhood and technology by paying tribute to to all the women, who are working towards making a difference in the world of Open Source technology.

As per our planning, we, the organizers did gather at Symbiosis Institute of Computer Studies and Research by 9.30am. It took us less than 20 minutes to arrange the room and put up a few posters around the campus, which could give our participants, the feel of event. The event was scheduled to begin at 10am. While planning the event, we had made a few mistakes (which I have listed at the end of the post) due to which we had a really low crowd turnout. After an hour of waiting, when we were almost about to call the event off and re-schedule it, did we have our guest speaker, Manjusha Joshi walk in. It was she who motivated us to continue with the event, even if we had way less number of participants than expected.

We began with the event an hour late. There are a few events, which often make us realize the fact that number is probably a wrong metric to measure the success of an event. Quality of audience is way more important. And this one was one such rare events. Though we had just 20 people in the room, those 20 people were probably there, cause they all genuinely wanted to take something back home from the session.

We restructured the entire schedule. [The initial event schedule can be found at http://wiki.mozillaindia.org/Celebrating_womanhood_and_technology]. We decided to have only the most important sessions. Diwanshi thus began the day, introducing Mozilla. Following her introduction, we invited Manjusha mam to share her Open Source journey with us. Her story was indeed inspiring. A married woman, belonging to a traditional Indian family, could manage to achieve so much in life, fighting challenges with way less resources than what we are blessed with these days. I salute her for being an icon for all of us!

After her session, I went to the podium, to take a session on Imposter Syndrome. I guess its irony in itself that the speaker of a topic like that, herself suffers from Imposter Symdrome. Thanks to Sumana for being an awesome speaker on this topic at AdaCamp, due to which, I was not only aware of the topic, but also able to share my knowledge, further with others.

After my session, Suchita also took a quick session, introducing a few initiatives by her college clubs, before Diwanshi ended the day with a session on Privacy and security.

Though I have been a co-organizer for this event, I couldn't give the event sufficient time, due a lot of personal work I was stuck with. But, I have learnt a few very important lessons from the event:

[1] Organizing an event on a Sunday is a bad idea. Its tough to get people out of their Sunday mood and get them to do anything constructive.

[2] A lot of research needs to be done before finalizing the dates of any event. Mainly an event targeted at college student needs to be planned carefully, keeping their exam schedules etc in mind. If we are celebrating some national or international days, where ofcourse the dates can't be changed, its probably better to plan it differently.

[3] Event promotion is a big responsibility and ownership needs to be taken for this.

[4] Every event, no matter how small, should follow a RASCI model. This helps every stakeholder be very clear about their responsibilities, so as to have a smooth execution of the event.
   
Yes, we also had cake!





















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Living the dream

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 3:17 AM in ,
Since my very early days of Open Source contribution, that goes back to my early days of college life, Red Hat had been my dream organization! The reasons behind this was probably many. During those initial days of my Open Source journey, I had been inspired by many Open source advocates and most of them were Red Hat employees. Also, many of the events that I had attended during my early college days used to be held at the Pune Red Hat office.

Well, as long as I had this dream of getting the appointment letter from Red Hat, life was exciting....but somehow I never thought how would I react once I had it! 


On Monday, when I walked into this office building, I was just as scared as a child, when he (or she) is going to school for the first time. Things then happened one after the other...each one more exciting than the previous one! New people, new space, new desk, new laptop, new monitor, new desk phone...and finally introduction to some new work. Wait, did I flaunt about the welcome kit? Its like a complete package...with all the stationary one could need at office. Well, I love stationary...and as a friend of mine did rightly say, it was indeed Disney land for me.

 
Can't speak much about the work, since I have not done much yet....but definitely the people and the place is just what I had dreamt about! 



2

A beautiful journey, finally coming to an end....leaving Scrollback

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 10:15 AM in , ,
In the last 8-9 months of my life, I have gone through some of the most beautiful experiences of my life, which has helped me grow, personally as well as professionally. Now its time to move on, implement those learning in making something bigger.

Scrollback had given me a new identity. I probably got famous on social media like never before! I could never refer to it as just another organization I worked for and it will always hold the same place in my heart. But just like all good things should come to an end, this journey also needs to.

I am leaving Scrollback in a week's time. I am joining Red Hat and moving back to Pune. This was never an easy decision. I have always loved Scrollback, as a product, as an Open Source community and of-course, most importantly, I have loved the work I had been doing and the people I had around me, to always guide, support and help me.

My career graph, if we plot it now, has a lot of ups and down. I have worked as a PHP developer in the initial 6 months of my work life, before moving to Scrollback as a Technical Evangelist. Somehow, I couldn't do much evangelism here. With the need of the organization, I moved more into community management. But, well, no kidding, I am not getting any younger and need to start thinking of building one profile, in any one domain, which I can sustain for the rest of my life! When the Red Hat offer came across, I saw it as an opportunity to experiment with another new profile and see if this can be the one which can ultimately settle me down.

Its tough (well, I would like to believe impossible) to take the Scrollbacker out of me now....its too deep in my blood. I will always keep contributing to Scrollback, in all possible ways. I will be joining Red Hat as a Technical Writer. There are a lot of reasons behind my decision to join Red Hat, out of which I guess I have already told the most important one, experiment a different profile. Another big reason is the fact that this offer came from Red Hat! Red Hat has been my dream organization since my early days of college! This Open Source organization has a constant reputation of hiring really cool people, and giving the ultimate work environment, along with the required freedom both at work as well as to maintain the work-life balance. I had wanted to join the cool gang for years and finally got the chance now!

This paragraph is unnecessary. Its only for all those who have been hearing (or spreading) rumours around this decision of mine. So, if you are not one of them, feel free to skip it. My decision was not influenced by the fact that the offered job location was Pune. I love Pune as a city, I never disagree to that, but, had the job location been the remotest village in India (or any part of the world), things would have not changed. Also, I am not taking this job because my "believed" boyfriend is at the same office! Trust me, even if that was true, I don't take career decisions based on emotional influences!

Having said most of the things, just to let everyone know, I am going to continue all my Mozilla activities the way I have been. Rather, I will be taking up a few community responsibilities again, since I am moving back to Pune and I have worked way more closely with this community than the Bangalore community. I will also continue contributing to Scrollback as a volunteer, so in-case you need to reach out to me for any Scrollback related queries, I am still available.

1

RASCI model - the responsibility assignment matrix

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 11:18 AM in ,
In the last few days, both at my workplace as well as while dealing with a few activities around me, I have realized the importance of implementing a better responsibility assignment matrix, to get things done in a less messed up way.

A few months back, during some random conversation, a friend of mine had introduced me to the RASCI model, one of the responsibility assignment matrices.

Wikipedia says that the responsibility assignment matrix 'describes the participation by various roles in completing tasks or deliverables for a project or business process.' 

In simple words, for any project, if we can divide each person's role and responsibility, it not only ensures a better end product, but also saves the time, otherwise lost in discussions (which organizations like to call as meetings). A RASCI implementation ensures that each person is responsible for only and only the task assigned to him (or her) and will not need to interfere with another person's task, unless asked to do so.

The responsibilities roles of RASCI are:


[1] Responsible - Those who do the work to achieve the task. There is at least one role with a participation type of responsible, although others can be delegated to assist in the work required. In any project, there can be one or more people taking up this role.

[2] Accountable (also approver or final approving authority) - The one ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. In other words, an accountable must sign off (approve) work that responsible provides. There must be only one accountable specified for each task or deliverable.

[3] Support - Resources allocated to responsible. Unlike consulted, who may provide input to the task, support help complete the task. People under this role mostly work with the responsible ones to complete the task. They are often not expected to directly deal with the accountable people.

[4] Consulted (sometimes counsel) - Those whose opinions are sought, typically subject matter experts.

[5] Informed - Those who are kept up-to-date on progress, often only on completion of the task or deliverable.




This video really does explain the RACI in a very simplified manner.

Benefits of using RACSI

  • Determines ownership of a particular project or task
  • Promotes teamwork by clarifying roles and responsibilities
  • Improves communication by getting the right groups involved
  • Increases efficiency by eliminating duplication of effort
  • Reduces misunderstanding between and across employees and key stakeholder groups
  • Improves decision-making by ensuring the correct people are involved
  • Provides the foundation for future alignment around a given project or initiative

Steps To Creating A Successful RASCI Chart

  • Identify and list all of the activities/tasks involved in the project down the vertical axis of a chart or spreadsheet.
  • Identify all of the people/roles involved in the project and list them across the horizontal axis or spreadsheet.
  • Identify the R, A, S, C, and I for each activity/task on your vertical axis.
  • Review and discuss gaps or overlaps in your work.

 
Sources -  

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Responsibility_assignment_matrix]

[2] http://www.thecanoegroup.com/470/project-management-6-steps-to-creating-a-successful-rasci-chart/ 

2

My first unconference format conference - AdaCamp Bangalore

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 2:25 AM in , , ,
I have never been to any AdaCamp before this one, just read a lot about it. Thus, I was really excited for my first AdaCamp from almost a month before the commencement of the event. Most importantly, I was responsible to take care of Mozilla's presence at this event. This included helping all the participating Mozillians to get to the city of the event, arrange their accommodation and food and finally make sure that other AdaCampers, who were not aware of Mozilla yet, could also know about this Open Source organization and its different projects.

I met the two AdaCamp organizers, Alex and Suki, for the first time at the reception dinner sponsored by 'Web We Want' on the evening of Friday, 21st November 2014. This was the same place where I also met a lot of other amazing ladies. The most interesting part was, meeting people whom I was already connected with, virtually, but was meeting for the first time.

The next two days were one of the most amazing and learning experiences of my life! This was my first unconference format conference. When I had initially heard about this concept, I was really worried that this might be a very messy process! Not deciding tracks of a conference before hand and deciding them on the day of those sessions, in a very democratic way, involving everyone in the decision making process...really? To my surprise, this was one of the most organized way of making the schedule of a conference, I have ever witnessed. I have been to several meetings where organizers and expert panels would spend hours, deciding, arguing over the structure of an event and its agenda. How we can give participants the power to decide, choose and finalize what they want to both teach and learn from a conference was not only an amazing idea but at AdaCamp Bangalore, it was also an amazingly executed idea!


The schedule of AdaCamp Bangalore, decided by participants

Another woooow moment for me at the AdaCamp was Sumana Harihareswara's session on 'Imposter Syndrome'. I was surprised to see that every woman sitting in that room, attending AdaCamp, agreed at a point that they do suffer from imposter syndrome in some way or the other. The handouts given for this session is something I have preserved to be able to share with my other female colleagues and friends.

Mozilla got to mark a good presence at AdaCamp. All the participating Mozillians, actively proposed several sessions for the two days of the conference and to my surprise, almost all of our sessions got sufficient appreciation and made it to the final schedule. From a generic introduction session to Mozilla and its community to sessions on Firefox OS as well as Webmaker, we did it all. Diwanshi's session on the Art and Craft community of Mozilla was probably the most colorful session of the event where all creative hands got together to create some amazing stuffs. 


Some of the makes of the Art and Craft session at AdaCamp

At AdaCamp, I also learnt the skill to organize and handle 'Lightening talks' better. There were so many other sessions, workshops, lunch discussions where I have not only learnt a lot of new things, have also found so many like minded people, together in one room.

Among all the great things that this event has taught me, a few which I would definitely like to list down are:

[1] While organizing events, we often don't take care of a lot of things. Since we like our beautiful faces to be clicked and published, we ignore the fact that there might be someone who might not enjoy it the same way. At AdaCamp, they take care of everyone's privacy. You get to choose from three different colored lanyards. Based on your preference on being photographed, you could choose to wear a particular colored lanyard. I totally admired this!

[2] Many of us like to blog, tweet or post about events and learning on different social media platforms, without realizing how much we are supposed to say and where the limit should be drawn to not hamper someone else's privacy. At AdaCamp, we were reminded of these factors. I have never been to another conference where everyone's privacy, their freedom was given such importance.

[3] The compliment wall. We all like to be appreciated and during the AdaCamp, we kept being appreciated for two full days. We had a wall where we had initially pinned up a lot of compliments, which we could think of, and later for the next two days, those compliments got down from the wall and reached the deserving person.  


The wall of compliments

I have learnt a lot from AdaCamp and honestly, if I organize events in the future, reflections of those learning will surely show!


The AdaCampers of Bangalore



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