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RASCI model - the responsibility assignment matrix

Posted by Priyanka Nag on 11:18 AM in ,
In the last few days, both at my workplace as well as while dealing with a few activities around me, I have realized the importance of implementing a better responsibility assignment matrix, to get things done in a less messed up way.

A few months back, during some random conversation, a friend of mine had introduced me to the RASCI model, one of the responsibility assignment matrices.

Wikipedia says that the responsibility assignment matrix 'describes the participation by various roles in completing tasks or deliverables for a project or business process.' 

In simple words, for any project, if we can divide each person's role and responsibility, it not only ensures a better end product, but also saves the time, otherwise lost in discussions (which organizations like to call as meetings). A RASCI implementation ensures that each person is responsible for only and only the task assigned to him (or her) and will not need to interfere with another person's task, unless asked to do so.

The responsibilities roles of RASCI are:


[1] Responsible - Those who do the work to achieve the task. There is at least one role with a participation type of responsible, although others can be delegated to assist in the work required. In any project, there can be one or more people taking up this role.

[2] Accountable (also approver or final approving authority) - The one ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. In other words, an accountable must sign off (approve) work that responsible provides. There must be only one accountable specified for each task or deliverable.

[3] Support - Resources allocated to responsible. Unlike consulted, who may provide input to the task, support help complete the task. People under this role mostly work with the responsible ones to complete the task. They are often not expected to directly deal with the accountable people.

[4] Consulted (sometimes counsel) - Those whose opinions are sought, typically subject matter experts.

[5] Informed - Those who are kept up-to-date on progress, often only on completion of the task or deliverable.




This video really does explain the RACI in a very simplified manner.

Benefits of using RACSI

  • Determines ownership of a particular project or task
  • Promotes teamwork by clarifying roles and responsibilities
  • Improves communication by getting the right groups involved
  • Increases efficiency by eliminating duplication of effort
  • Reduces misunderstanding between and across employees and key stakeholder groups
  • Improves decision-making by ensuring the correct people are involved
  • Provides the foundation for future alignment around a given project or initiative

Steps To Creating A Successful RASCI Chart

  • Identify and list all of the activities/tasks involved in the project down the vertical axis of a chart or spreadsheet.
  • Identify all of the people/roles involved in the project and list them across the horizontal axis or spreadsheet.
  • Identify the R, A, S, C, and I for each activity/task on your vertical axis.
  • Review and discuss gaps or overlaps in your work.

 
Sources -  

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Responsibility_assignment_matrix]

[2] http://www.thecanoegroup.com/470/project-management-6-steps-to-creating-a-successful-rasci-chart/ 

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